Tuesday, 31 May 2016

INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES- PART 4


Where you have been able to get your CV to speak for you and you have been called for an interview, you then have to speak for yourself at the interview.

In the first blog on interviewing techniques, we mentioned a few bullet points which we are continuing with in this blog.

NEVER ANSWER A QUESTION AS “NO”:
Never say no to an interview question, even if you do not know anything about what was asked. Instead, I always say, answer the question like a politician. Think of anything which you know may relate to the subject asked and try to get a closely related answer.

For example, if you are asked; do you know how to use Quick books and maybe you have never used this before, rather than saying no, you may want to consider saying something like;

“I am able to use Sage 50 confidently up to trial balance level, but not Quick books, but I also know that all accounting software are built on the same double entry principle and with little guidance I will be able to use Quick books confidently”.

Notice, I have not said no I don’t know how to use Quick books, but I have implied it anyway, but in setting an answer like above, you are giving yourself a fighting chance in getting the job.

Notice, also in this answer, there is a trace of using accounting terminologies- Sage 50, trial balance, double entry principle. This will show, you don’t know the exact subject being asked, but you are still reflecting signs of knowledge in accounting. You never can tell, the company may be willing to train you on the aspects they may find lacking if they are convinced you have other strong accounting qualities.


Ability to swing a question to your advantage, does not come easily, it comes with practice and loads of practice. So get on with asking yourself questions and speaking out answers to such questions, using the right accounting terminologies.



WE WISH YOU ALL TH BEST from:
THE TRAINING PLACE OF EXCELLENCE


Friday, 27 May 2016

INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES- PART 3

Where you have been able to get your CV to speak for you and you have been called for an interview, you then have to speak for yourself at the interview.

In the first blog on interviewing techniques, we mentioned a few bullet points which we are continuing with in this blog.

USE ACCOUNTING TERMINOLOGIES:

This is very important in dealing with interview questions. Employers are looking for people who have the experience, so the more you are able to shine this out the better your chances are of getting the job.

For example, if you are asked, “can you carry out bank reconciliation?”

Answer- Yes I can. I have to make sure all data entry is carried out and I click all transactions that appear on the bank statement and then match. The difference at the bottom should become 0 and then I click reconcile.

Compared to:

Answer- Yes I can. I have to make sure I post all the customers invoices into the sales ledger, I then post all suppliers invoices to the purchases ledger and all bank postings have to be carried out in the bank ledger. Once all these posting have been done, the double entry effect can be checked in the nominal ledger for accuracy of postings. I am then ready to proceed with the bank reconciliation and this means I have to go to the bank ledger and click on reconcile ….

Notice the second answer has a lot of accounting terminologies and in getting an answer with such level of terminologies will make you stand out from someone that just refers to data entry or posting of transactions.

You have to bear in mind that using the right terminologies is very important and this has to flow smoothly in your answers. The ability to do this doesn’t come naturally; it only comes with practice and loads of practice for that matter.

So I will strongly encourage you to get talking. I call it “TALK THE TALK”.

Ask yourself questions, and speak about the answers to anybody who will listen to you- family member, friend, pet- a dog or cat who will give you audience. If you don’t have any of these, sit yourself down in front of a mirror and watch yourself answer these basic questions and loads more:
  •           How do you post customers invoices
  •            How do you post suppliers invoices
  •            How do you set up or rename a nominal code
  •            How do you generate remittance advice for suppliers
  •            How do you carry out bank reconciliations
  •            How do you post salary journals
  •        How do you account for accruals
  •        How do you account for credit notes
  •          How do you make refunds to customers 

These are all basic questions, do you know the answers to these. If you don’t, you need to get some work experience in accounting and then build on that. 

See yourself apply accounting terminologies in answering each of these and you will notice that the answers you give to each of these will get better and better as you practice. 

Please make sure that you are speaking out the answers, don’t just play it over in your head and think you know it, because you may not be able to speak it out confidently and smoothly.


WE WISH YOU ALL TH BEST from:
THE TRAINING PLACE OF EXCELLENCE
















Thursday, 26 May 2016

INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES- PART 2

Where you have been able to get your CV to speak for you and you have been called for an interview, you then have to speak for yourself at the interview.

In the last blog, the first point mentioned was the issue of confidence and then using work related scenarios

CONFIDENCE & PERSONALITY:

Make sure that you express confidence when answering your questions. Do not fidget or slouch into the seat and maintain eye contact. It is easy to pick up an individual’s confidence or lack of confidence at an interview, so coach yourself in being able to answer questions knowledgeably and confidently.

Add some nice and warm personality to the confidence. Try to give a nice smile when necessary or where you see the opportunity for that.

Remember accounts people are seen as boring, so try to show the potential employer that you are not that boring (ha! may be just a little boring).

WORK RELATED SCENARIOS:

You want to constantly review scenarios and encounters you have experienced at work and develop standard answers for general questions which could be asked at interviews. For example, a question about your team playing skills, communication skills, ability to work under pressure, ability to apply initiative etc.

Team playing skills:

You can speak about how you currently work in a small team and you have had to multi-task and assist others with their duties in order to make sure we are all effectively meeting tight deadlines within the group. You may be responsible for sales invoices, but you also offer assistance in processing purchase invoices, so that the bank reconciliations and the management reports can be completed on time for the board meeting.

Think about scenarios and replay these scenarios again and again. Have them readily available in your head so that you can reach out to an applicable one for questions you are asked. As you don’t know the question you would be asked, have a few scenarios always ready.

These scenarios don’t always have to be accounts related, they don’t always have to be work related either, but it is best if most of them are accounts work related, as this will help you shine out your accounting skills.

The next best advice to offer you will be to sit in front of a mirror and practice using scenario based answers. Ask yourself simple questions and see how you answer and continue to practice to improve your confidence and ability to answer interview questions.


THE TRAINING PLACE OF EXCELLENCE

Wednesday, 25 May 2016

INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES- PART 1

Where you have been able to get your CV to speak for you and you have been called for an interview, you then have to speak for yourself at the interview.
    
Bear the following points in mind:
  • Be confident in your answers and how you relate them across
  • Use as many work related scenarios in answering your questions as possible
  • Use accounting terminologies as much as possible
  • Never say “NO” to a question                                                                                        
  • Always ask one or two questions at the end when given the opportunity to do so
  • Start and end with a firm handshake and greet the interviewers using their names, where possible
In the next sets of blogs I will be expanding on each of the above bullet points, so I will encourage you to read through these if you are seriously looking for work.


WE WISH YOU ALL TH BEST from:
THE TRAINING PLACE OF EXCELLENCE